Chaturanga Dandasana: Avoid Mistakes that Lead to Injury

Chaturanga Dandasana, a very popular pose, that is hard to do right and can easily lead to injury.

What is Chaturanga Danasana?

Chaturanga Danasana is also known as four-limbed staff pose. It’s a great pose for building strength. It helps strengthen your arms, shoulders, legs, and core.

You will so this pose a lot in a yoga class, especially a Vinyasa or Ashtanga class. If you struggle with this pose, you can always put your knees down.

My upper body strength was really lacking when I started yoga. I couldn’t do a Chaturanga without my knees. Slowly, I worked up to one Chaturanga a class without my knees, and then two, three, and so on. Eventually, I was able to do about 85 Chaturangas in a 90-minute Ashtanga class without my knees!

You shouldn’t do this pose if you have a wrist or shoulder injury or if you are pregnant. As always, you should talk to your doctor before starting any form of exercise.

Common Chaturanga Danasana Mistakes

Since this is such a popular pose, you will want to make sure that you are doing it properly. The truth is, I see these mistakes often. It is probably the hardest pose for my students.

Doing this pose wrong over and over again will almost certainly cause an injury at some point.

Here are the top things you want to look out for.

Lowering your shoulders too far to the ground.

Chaturanga Dandasana, a very popular pose, that is hard to do right and can easily lead to injury.

Lifting your hips.

Chaturanga Dandasana, a very popular pose, that is hard to do right and can easily lead to injury.

Letting your stomach sag.

Chaturanga Dandasana, a very popular pose, that is hard to do right and can easily lead to injury.

How to Do Chaturanga Danasana Correctly

Chaturanga Dandasana, a very popular pose, that is hard to do right and can easily lead to injury.

  1. Start in a plank.
  2. Inhale and engage your core, shifting your weight and gaze slightly forward.
  3. Exhale and lower with strength until your arms are at a 90-degree angle. Make sure you keep your body strong and straight in this step. Don’t dip your shoulders down.

When we do Chaturanga, we are doing a pushing motion. In order to keep balance in your body, you should counter this by doing a pulling motion. A great pulling pose is Sarpasana. Read 9 Amazing Benefits of Sarpasana to find out how and why you should be doing this pose. There is also a mini flow that includes Sarpasana!

Namaste,

Abby

Abby is a teacher and student of yoga, passionate about her yoga journey and helping others on theirs. She is the blogger behind Journeys of Yoga, a second-grade teacher and a contributing writer at TryBelle Magazine. Learn more about Abby. You can also contact her here.